67 | Staff
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Linda Sanchez

Program Director

Jacqueline Garcia-Martinez

Program Associate

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is a twenty-six year old Zapoteca from Oaxaca, Mexico. Her activism started while organizing for the Federal Dream Act when she was a high school student. While obtaining her B.A. from UC Berkeley she encountered many people, amongst them the youth of 67 Sueños who have deeply influenced her activism. As a student at UC Berkeley, Linda co-founded Casa Sin Fronteras (formally known as Dream House), was the coordinator of Entre Familia, a scholarship platform for undocumented youth pre-CA Dream Act, and most recently founded Fuerza Indígena, a social enterprise to politically and economically uplift Fruitvale’s indigenous Mam population. Her experiences of being undocumented and indigenous propels her to be deeply rooted in community advocacy and people self-determination. Linda serves as 67 Sueños program director since 2015 and brings a wealth of experience in youth activism, community organizing, and social enterprises. She is deeply committed to uplifting migrant youth voices and working in collaboration with them to find their voice and power.

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is a warrior scholar and Xicana Xingona who is from Oakland, CalifAztlan, “The town”. Her family is deeply rooted in Michoacan & Guadalajara. In 2010, after experiencing family separation by the unjust immigration system, she took action and cofounded 67 Sueños alongside her peers and mentor Pablo Paredes. In that same year she joined the Xicana Moratorium Coalition in Oakland and co-led citywide walkouts to fight and defeat the Oakland Gang Injunctions. Since then, Jackie has been organizing and mentoring over 30 youth to be civically and politically involved in their communities. In 2016, Jackie received her B.A. from San Francisco State University. Her experience at 67 Sueños gave her a wealth of knowledge and tools to continue working towards improving the social and political conditions in her community.

Humberto “Beto” Ortiz-Silva

Ron Zuckerman Fellow

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was born en La Ciudad de México, Distrito Federal; raised in Los Angeles, Califas as an undocumented youth; and flourished as an independent young man in the Bay Area. Ever since the pro-migrant Los Angeles Unified School District walkouts in 2006, Beto has been active in social justice work through various capacities. He has served as an educator across community-level platforms (such as Freedom Schools Los Angeles in 2010), institutional platforms (such as UC Berkeley in 2014), and non-profit platforms (such as Resources Community Development in 2015). Beto took a short break from the educational arena in order to expand his knowledge of immigration law. After working within the law sector as a paralegal, he decided to return home to his community-driven roots and work with 67 Sueños. With 67 Sueños he incorporates his background in education and immigration law, as well as blending his personal passion of the arts, and develops youth leadership curriculum that involves music production, poetry, creative writing, and self-expression.

former employees

Pablo Paredes, Former Program Director

Pablo​ ​Paredes​ ​is​ ​a​ ​Conscientious​ ​Objector​ ​to​ ​war​ ​in​ ​all​ ​forms.​ ​​In​ ​2004​ ​Paredes​ ​made headlines​ ​as​ ​US​ ​Navy​ ​Salior​ ​who​ ​refused​ ​to​ ​board​ ​a​ ​naval​ ​vessel​ ​with​ ​a​ ​mission​ ​to​ ​ferry 1000+​ ​marines​ ​to​ ​Iraq.​ ​​ ​This​ ​came​ ​after​ ​five​ ​years​ ​of​ ​distinguished​ ​service​ ​in​ ​the​ ​US​ ​Navy. Paredes​ ​was​ ​then​ ​court-martialed​ ​and​ ​eventually​ ​discharged​ ​from​ ​the​ ​Navy​ ​after​ ​serving​ ​a sentence​ ​of​ ​3​ ​months​ ​hard​ ​labor,​ ​2​ ​months​ ​restriction,​ ​and​ ​reduction​ ​in​ ​rank​ ​to​ ​the​ ​navy’s lowest​ ​pay​ ​grade.​ ​​Since​ ​obtaining​ ​his​ ​freedom​ ​from​ ​the​ ​armed​ ​forces​ ​Pablo​ ​has​ ​dedicated himself​ ​to​ ​building​ ​youth​ ​power​ ​in​ ​communities​ ​of​ ​color​ ​to​ ​challenge​ ​militarism,​ ​racism​ ​and xenophobia.​ ​The​ ​33​ ​year​ ​old​ ​has​ ​spoken​ ​at​ ​hundreds​ ​of​ ​High​ ​Schools​ ​in​ ​several​ ​states​ ​as well​ ​as​ ​in​ ​Puerto​ ​Rico.

In​ ​November​ ​of​ ​2005​ ​he​ ​took​ ​his​ ​message​ ​to​ ​an​ ​armed​ ​conflict​ ​ridden​ ​area​ ​of​ ​Colombia known​ ​as​ ​Putumayo.​ ​​ ​There​ ​he​ ​worked​ ​with​ ​a​ ​group​ ​of​ ​middle​ ​and​ ​high​ ​school​ ​aged​ ​youth to​ ​create​ ​alternatives​ ​to​ ​joining​ ​the​ ​armed​ ​struggle​ ​in​ ​Colombia.

Son​ ​of​ ​an​ ​Ecuadorian​ ​(im)migrant​ ​father​ ​and​ ​a​ ​Puerto​ ​Rican​ ​mother,​ ​Paredes​ ​has​ ​always had​ ​a​ ​deep​ ​connection​ ​to​ ​and​ ​passion​ ​for​ ​migrant​ ​justice​ ​issues.​ ​​His​ ​wife​ ​became undocumented​ ​in​ ​the​ ​first​ ​years​ ​of​ ​their​ ​relationship.​ ​​ ​His​ ​family​ ​lived​ ​the​ ​fear​ ​of​ ​the possibility​ ​of​ ​raids​ ​and​ ​checkpoints​ ​destroying​ ​their​ ​young​ ​family​ ​in​ ​the​ ​border​ ​town​ ​of​ ​San Diego.

Paredes​ ​has​ ​spent​ ​the​ ​past​ ​8​ ​years​ ​doing​ ​youth​ ​organizing​ ​work​ ​in​ ​the​ ​San​ ​Francisco​ ​Bay Area.​ ​​ ​He​ ​co-founded​ ​BAY-Peace,​ ​(Beter​ ​Alternatives​ ​for​ ​Youth).​ ​​The​ ​group​ ​successfully campaigned​ ​for​ ​the​ ​strongest​ ​district​ ​policies​ ​in​ ​the​ ​nation​ ​for​ ​Oakland,​ ​San​ ​Francisco​ ​and Berkeley​ ​around​ ​military​ ​recruitment​ ​and​ ​student​ ​privacy.​ ​​ ​In​ ​2010​ ​he​ ​brought​ ​together​ ​a core​ ​group​ ​of​ ​high​ ​school​ ​aged​ ​(im)migrant​ ​youth​ ​to​ ​begin​ ​the​ ​67​ ​Sueños​ ​collective.​ ​In​ ​the​ ​summer​ ​of​ ​2011​ ​the​ ​group​ ​was​ ​featured​ ​on​ ​the​ ​front​ ​page​ ​of the​ ​San​ ​Francisco​ ​Chronicle​ ​for​ ​a​ ​Mural​ ​declaring​ ​No​ ​Human​ ​Being​ ​Is​ ​Illegal.​ ​​ ​67​ ​Sueños​ ​has been​ ​the​ ​subject​ ​of​ ​a​ ​3​ ​part​ ​series​ ​on​ ​Univision​ ​14​ ​and​ ​featured​ ​in​ ​media​ ​outlets​ ​including KPFA,​ ​ColorLines,​ ​New​ ​American​ ​Media​ ​and​ ​many​ ​more.

Ericson Amaya, Youth Mentor

Ericson Amaya, aka E, was born and raised in DEEP EAST Oakland, CA. At a young age, he experienced violence and has lost family and friends due to gun violence. While at 67 Sueños, Young E discovered poetry, it allowed him to express himself and take control of his destiny. Once on a path to be a high school dropout, he changed his course and is now completing his third year at San Francisco State University while working as a youth organizer with 67 Sueños. Young E has mentored over 20 youth, mainly young males who have found themselves in his very same shoes and continues to use poetry as one of his main tools to help transform their lives. Any given time, you can find Young E speaking out against state and police violence, pushing to stop Urban Shield and swat raids in Oakland, working closely with youth to ensure they reach their full potential, or submerging himself in his academic books.

Yoxeli Romero, Youth Mentor

Yoxeli Romero, a Xingona Guerrera, was part of the 7 core youth who envisioned and co-founded 67 Sueños back in 2010. She started as a high school intern and after graduating she transitioned into a youth mentor. She found passion in the work because for the first time she felt empowered as an undocumented youth. Before 67 Sueños, she had fell into the shadows, feeling voiceless and unempowered. With the guidance and support she received at 67 Sueños she was determined to speak her story. She understood that she wasn’t only speaking for herself but also for her family, friends, and community. Yoxeli saw 67 Sueños not just as a program but as a familia. Yoxeli shares that 67 saved her at a time in her life where she was lost. She felt so powerful that she felt that she could knock down the border with her bare hands and that together at 67 Sueños we could change the laws with our stories. Today you find Yoxeli feeling brown and proud, and still in a path of discovering who she is.

Javiera Torres, UCSC Community Studies Intern

Javiera Torres, a sweet soul with fearless energy joined 67 Sueños back in 2014 as a full-time community studies intern from UCSC. With raíces en Santiago, Chile, but raised in Sac town, she came into 67 as a pollinator who spread love, hope, and resiliency to the young people she engaged with.

(How has your past and your upbringing lead you to focus on community healing and youth work)

While at 67 Sueños the young people appreciated how caring, thoughtful, and what a great listener she was. Finding her passion in community healing, Javiera continues to dedicate her energy to 67 Sueños by supporting as a circle leader, mentor, ally, and overall trustworthy sister in the struggle. Today you can find Javiera doing amazing work at Impact Youth Hub as an Opportunity Network Manager.

Oscar Calderon, UCSC Community Studies Intern

His family rooted in Michoacan, Mexico and growing up in Deep East Oakland has shaped the person who Oscar is today. Going through the charter schooling system, Oscar felt lost when looking for himself represented in the history textbooks. He felt detached from his culture and history. Although the school he attended was 95% Latino, he felt like his community was silenced and in the shadows. He came to 67 Sueños through his major community studies at University of California Santa Cruz. He was interested in working with 67 Sueños because he found a path to reconnect to his history, culture, and traditions. Through that knowledge he was able to find his voice and find his power of resistance. Oscar became a great mentor for the youth at 67 by providing them with a platform to be creative physically, mentally and emotionally. One place where Oscar showcased his leadership and commitment with 67 Sueños was when he co-led a rally with young people from 13 different Oakland high schools, to be able to speak out against hatred and racism that affects their families and communities on the daily. Today you can catch Oscar as a Contra Costa program facilitator at Project WHAT!, an organization that works with youth who have incarcerated parents.

Alba Diaz Canela, UCSC Community Studies College Intern

Alba Diaz Canela is a college intern from the University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC). She is a first generation student, entering her senior year at UCSC, double majoring in Psychology and Community Studies. She is originally from Michoacan, Mexico, but settled in the Northern Bay Area. It was at the university, specifically her involvement at Oakes College, where she became politically conscious and began to connect pieces of her experiences to academic and political terms that depicted her lived reality. Her passion for social justice began to grow, which led Alba to pursue Community Studies, where political consciousness touches local communities. It was through this major that she became connected to the work of 67 Sueños. For Alba, 67 Sueños creates a safe space for young people to learn about themselves, heal from their traumas, explore their cultures, reconnect with themselves and their community. Alba joined the team empowered by her voice and mentors youth to reach their goals in the same matter.

STAFF
linda1

Linda Sanchez

Program Director

is a twenty-six year old Zapoteca from Oaxaca, Mexico. Her activism started while organizing for the Federal Dream Act when she was a high school student. While obtaining her B.A. from UC Berkeley she encountered many people, amongst them the youth of 67 Sueños who have deeply influenced her activism. As a student at UC Berkeley, Linda co-founded Casa Sin Fronteras (formally known as Dream House), was the coordinator of Entre Familia, a scholarship platform for undocumented youth pre-CA Dream Act, and most recently founded Fuerza Indígena, a social enterprise to politically and economically uplift Fruitvale’s indigenous Mam population.

Her experiences of being undocumented and indigenous propels her to be deeply rooted in community advocacy and people self-determination. Linda serves as 67 Sueños program director since 2015 and brings a wealth of experience in youth activism, community organizing, and social enterprises. She is deeply committed to uplifting migrant youth voices and working in collaboration with them to find their voice and power.

jackie1

Jacqueline Garcia-Martinez

Program Associate

is a warrior scholar and Xicana Xingona who is from Oakland, CalifAztlan, “The town”. Her family is deeply rooted in Michoacan & Guadalajara. In 2010, after experiencing family separation by the unjust immigration system, she took action and cofounded 67 Sueños alongside her peers and mentor Pablo Paredes. In that same year she joined the Xicana Moratorium Coalition in Oakland and co-led citywide walkouts to fight and defeat the Oakland Gang Injunctions. Since then, Jackie has been organizing and mentoring over 30 youth to be civically and politically involved in their communities. In 2016, Jackie received her B.A. from San Francisco State University. Her experience at 67 Sueños gave her a wealth of knowledge and tools to continue working towards improving the social and political conditions in her community.

bet

Humberto “Beto” Ortiz-Silva

Ron Zuckerman Fellow

was born en La Ciudad de México, Distrito Federal; raised in Los Angeles, Califas as an undocumented youth; and flourished as an independent young man in the Bay Area. Ever since the pro-migrant Los Angeles Unified School District walkouts in 2006, Beto has been active in social justice work through various capacities. He has served as an educator across community-level platforms (such as Freedom Schools Los Angeles in 2010), institutional platforms (such as UC Berkeley in 2014), and non-profit platforms (such as Resources Community Development in 2015).

Beto took a short break from the educational arena in order to expand his knowledge of immigration law. After working within the law sector as a paralegal, he decided to return home to his community-driven roots and work with 67 Sueños. With 67 Sueños he incorporates his background in education and immigration law, as well as blending his personal passion of the arts, and develops youth leadership curriculum that involves music production, poetry, creative writing, and self-expression.

former staff

Pablo Paredes

Former Program Director

Pablo​ ​Paredes​ ​is​ ​a​ ​Conscientious​ ​Objector​ ​to​ ​war​ ​in​ ​all​ ​forms.​ ​​In​ ​2004​ ​Paredes​ ​made headlines​ ​as​ ​US​ ​Navy​ ​Salior​ ​who​ ​refused​ ​to​ ​board​ ​a​ ​naval​ ​vessel​ ​with​ ​a​ ​mission​ ​to​ ​ferry 1000+​ ​marines​ ​to​ ​Iraq.​ ​​ ​This​ ​came​ ​after​ ​five​ ​years​ ​of​ ​distinguished​ ​service​ ​in​ ​the​ ​US​ ​Navy. Paredes​ ​was​ ​then​ ​court-martialed​ ​and​ ​eventually​ ​discharged​ ​from​ ​the​ ​Navy​ ​after​ ​serving​ ​a sentence​ ​of​ ​3​ ​months​ ​hard​ ​labor,​ ​2​ ​months​ ​restriction,​ ​and​ ​reduction​ ​in​ ​rank​ ​to​ ​the​ ​navy’s lowest​ ​pay​ ​grade.​ ​​Since​ ​obtaining​ ​his​ ​freedom​ ​from​ ​the​ ​armed​ ​forces​ ​Pablo​ ​has​ ​dedicated himself​ ​to​ ​building​ ​youth​ ​power​ ​in​ ​communities​ ​of​ ​color​ ​to​ ​challenge​ ​militarism,​ ​racism​ ​and xenophobia.​ ​The​ ​33​ ​year​ ​old​ ​has​ ​spoken​ ​at​ ​hundreds​ ​of​ ​High​ ​Schools​ ​in​ ​several​ ​states​ ​as well​ ​as​ ​in​ ​Puerto​ ​Rico.

In​ ​November​ ​of​ ​2005​ ​he​ ​took​ ​his​ ​message​ ​to​ ​an​ ​armed​ ​conflict​ ​ridden​ ​area​ ​of​ ​Colombia known​ ​as​ ​Putumayo.​ ​​ ​There​ ​he​ ​worked​ ​with​ ​a​ ​group​ ​of​ ​middle​ ​and​ ​high​ ​school​ ​aged​ ​youth to​ ​create​ ​alternatives​ ​to​ ​joining​ ​the​ ​armed​ ​struggle​ ​in​ ​Colombia.

Son​ ​of​ ​an​ ​Ecuadorian​ ​(im)migrant​ ​father​ ​and​ ​a​ ​Puerto​ ​Rican​ ​mother,​ ​Paredes​ ​has​ ​always had​ ​a​ ​deep​ ​connection​ ​to​ ​and​ ​passion​ ​for​ ​migrant​ ​justice​ ​issues.​ ​​His​ ​wife​ ​became undocumented​ ​in​ ​the​ ​first​ ​years​ ​of​ ​their​ ​relationship.​ ​​ ​His​ ​family​ ​lived​ ​the​ ​fear​ ​of​ ​the possibility​ ​of​ ​raids​ ​and​ ​checkpoints​ ​destroying​ ​their​ ​young​ ​family​ ​in​ ​the​ ​border​ ​town​ ​of​ ​San Diego.

Paredes​ ​has​ ​spent​ ​the​ ​past​ ​8​ ​years​ ​doing​ ​youth​ ​organizing​ ​work​ ​in​ ​the​ ​San​ ​Francisco​ ​Bay Area.​ ​​ ​He​ ​co-founded​ ​BAY-Peace,​ ​(Beter​ ​Alternatives​ ​for​ ​Youth).​ ​​The​ ​group​ ​successfully campaigned​ ​for​ ​the​ ​strongest​ ​district​ ​policies​ ​in​ ​the​ ​nation​ ​for​ ​Oakland,​ ​San​ ​Francisco​ ​and Berkeley​ ​around​ ​military​ ​recruitment​ ​and​ ​student​ ​privacy.​ ​​ ​In​ ​2010​ ​he​ ​brought​ ​together​ ​a core​ ​group​ ​of​ ​high​ ​school​ ​aged​ ​(im)migrant​ ​youth​ ​to​ ​begin​ ​the​ ​67​ ​Sueños​ ​collective.​ ​In​ ​the​ ​summer​ ​of​ ​2011​ ​the​ ​group​ ​was​ ​featured​ ​on​ ​the​ ​front​ ​page​ ​of the​ ​San​ ​Francisco​ ​Chronicle​ ​for​ ​a​ ​Mural​ ​declaring​ ​No​ ​Human​ ​Being​ ​Is​ ​Illegal.​ ​​ ​67​ ​Sueños​ ​has been​ ​the​ ​subject​ ​of​ ​a​ ​3​ ​part​ ​series​ ​on​ ​Univision​ ​14​ ​and​ ​featured​ ​in​ ​media​ ​outlets​ ​including KPFA,​ ​ColorLines,​ ​New​ ​American​ ​Media​ ​and​ ​many​ ​more.

Ericson Amaya

Youth Mentor

Ericson Amaya, aka E, was born and raised in DEEP EAST Oakland, CA. At a young age, he experienced violence and has lost family and friends due to gun violence. While at 67 Sueños, Young E discovered poetry, it allowed him to express himself and take control of his destiny. Once on a path to be a high school dropout, he changed his course and is now completing his third year at San Francisco State University while working as a youth organizer with 67 Sueños. Young E has mentored over 20 youth, mainly young males who have found themselves in his very same shoes and continues to use poetry as one of his main tools to help transform their lives. Any given time, you can find Young E speaking out against state and police violence, pushing to stop Urban Shield and swat raids in Oakland, working closely with youth to ensure they reach their full potential, or submerging himself in his academic books.

Yoxeli Romero

Youth Mentor

Yoxeli Romero, a Xingona Guerrera, was part of the 7 core youth who envisioned and co-founded 67 Sueños back in 2010. She started as a high school intern and after graduating she transitioned into a youth mentor. She found passion in the work because for the first time she felt empowered as an undocumented youth. Before 67 Sueños, she had fell into the shadows, feeling voiceless and unempowered. With the guidance and support she received at 67 Sueños she was determined to speak her story. She understood that she wasn’t only speaking for herself but also for her family, friends, and community. Yoxeli saw 67 Sueños not just as a program but as a familia. Yoxeli shares that 67 saved her at a time in her life where she was lost. She felt so powerful that she felt that she could knock down the border with her bare hands and that together at 67 Sueños we could change the laws with our stories. Today you find Yoxeli feeling brown and proud, and still in a path of discovering who she is.

Javiera Torres

UCSC Community Studies Intern

Javiera Torres, a sweet soul with fearless energy joined 67 Sueños back in 2014 as a full-time community studies intern from UCSC. With raíces en Santiago, Chile, but raised in Sac town, she came into 67 as a pollinator who spread love, hope, and resiliency to the young people she engaged with.

(How has your past and your upbringing lead you to focus on community healing and youth work)

While at 67 Sueños the young people appreciated how caring, thoughtful, and what a great listener she was. Finding her passion in community healing, Javiera continues to dedicate her energy to 67 Sueños by supporting as a circle leader, mentor, ally, and overall trustworthy sister in the struggle. Today you can find Javiera doing amazing work at Impact Youth Hub as an Opportunity Network Manager.

Oscar Calderon

UCSC Community Studies Intern

His family rooted in Michoacan, Mexico and growing up in Deep East Oakland has shaped the person who Oscar is today. Going through the charter schooling system, Oscar felt lost when looking for himself represented in the history textbooks. He felt detached from his culture and history. Although the school he attended was 95% Latino, he felt like his community was silenced and in the shadows. He came to 67 Sueños through his major community studies at University of California Santa Cruz. He was interested in working with 67 Sueños because he found a path to reconnect to his history, culture, and traditions.

Through that knowledge he was able to find his voice and find his power of resistance. Oscar became a great mentor for the youth at 67 by providing them with a platform to be creative physically, mentally and emotionally. One place where Oscar showcased his leadership and commitment with 67 Sueños was when he co-led a rally with young people from 13 different Oakland high schools, to be able to speak out against hatred and racism that affects their families and communities on the daily. Today you can catch Oscar as a Contra Costa program facilitator at Project WHAT!, an organization that works with youth who have incarcerated parents.

Alba Diaz Canela

UCSC Community Studies College Intern

Alba Diaz Canela is a college intern from the University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC). She is a first generation student, entering her senior year at UCSC, double majoring in Psychology and Community Studies. She is originally from Michoacan, Mexico, but settled in the Northern Bay Area. It was at the university, specifically her involvement at Oakes College, where she became politically conscious and began to connect pieces of her experiences to academic and political terms that depicted her lived reality.

Her passion for social justice began to grow, which led Alba to pursue Community Studies, where political consciousness touches local communities. It was through this major that she became connected to the work of 67 Sueños. For Alba, 67 Sueños creates a safe space for young people to learn about themselves, heal from their traumas, explore their cultures, reconnect with themselves and their community. Alba joined the team empowered by her voice and mentors youth to reach their goals in the same matter.